SAIBs Issued for C-150/152 Elevator; Continental 550/520 Series Engines

On May 11, 2017, the FAA issued a Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) that highlights the potential for loose elevator attach bolts on certain Cessna 150/152 models. The SAIB was issued based on a service difficulty report of an elevator hinge bolt backing out on a C-150. The FAA recommends performing the inspections detailed in the Cessna supplemental inspection document (SID) 55-10-01. Both the SAIB and the SID(s) can be found here.

The FAA also issued an SAIB on May 10 which outlines available service instructions for identifying causes of engine kickback and recommended engine inspections following a kickback event on certain Continental Motors, Inc., 550 and 520 series reciprocating engines. See the full bulletin here.

NOTICE: New KTRK Tower, as of 6/01/2017

We wanted to notify you that Truckee Airport KTRK will become a tower operated airport from 07:00 to 21:00, as of June 1, 2017. It is vital to note that the chart will still indicate the airspace as Class E airspace all the way to the ground, not Class D despite the tower.

The chart will also label the tower frequency as a “CTAF.” The frequency is 120.575. There is no ground frequency, just tower. Use the frequency just like a class D airport even though the airspace on the chart indicates class E and the frequency is indicated as a CTAF. After a year, the airspace will be properly promoted to Class D.

As always, check your NOTAMs before each flight and blue skies and tailwinds to you!

More details here.

The FAA encourages general aviation pilots to learn how to meet the BasicMed requirements

Notice Number: NOTC7130

General aviation pilots can now prepare to fly under BasicMed without holding a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) medical certificate as long as they meet certain requirements. They can fly under BasicMed beginning on May 1, the effective date of the January 10 final rule. It offers pilots an alternative to the FAA’s medical qualification process for third class medical certificates, while keeping general aviation pilots safe and flying affordable.

General aviation pilots may take advantage of the regulatory relief in the BasicMed rule or opt to continue to use their FAA medical certificate. Under BasicMed, a pilot will be required to complete a medical education course every two years, undergo a medical examination every four years, and comply with aircraft and operating restrictions. For example, pilots using BasicMed cannot operate an aircraft with more than six people onboard and the aircraft must not weigh more than 6,000 pounds.

A pilot flying under the BasicMed rule must:

  • possess a valid driver’s license;
  • consent to a National Driver Register check;
  • have held a medical certificate that was valid at any time after July 15, 2006;
  • have not had the most recently held medical certificate revoked, suspended, or withdrawn;
  • have not had the most recent application for airman medical certification completed and denied;
  • have taken a BasicMed online medical education course within the past 24 calendar months;
  • have completed a comprehensive medical examination with any state-licensed physician within the past 48 months;
  • have been found eligible for special issuance of a medical certificate for certain specified mental health, neurological, or cardiovascular conditions, when applicable; and
  • not fly for compensation or hire.

Pilots can read and print the Comprehensive Medical Examination Checklist and learn about online BasicMed online medical courses at www.faa.gov/go/BasicMed

4 tables missing..!!

We had ‘standing room only’ at our last member meeting, because someone borrowed 4 of our folding tables.

Our inventory of assets lists 9 tables. there are 5 in the hangar.

If you know who has these table, please let Jim know.

FAA Calls for Heightened Awareness of Class B Airspace

In a Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) bulletin issued January 29, 2017, the FAA is calling for all pilots and flightcrew operating near the boundaries of Class B airspace to exercise caution and be aware of the risk of excursions out of and incursions into Class B airspace. According to the SAFO, all pilots and flightcrew should utilize published resources to become familiar with the vertical and lateral boundaries of Class B airspace they may be operating in or near. For more information, see the entire SAFO here.

FAA Issues New “BasicMed” Rule for GA Pilots

The FAA this week issued a final rule (BasicMed) that allows GA pilots to fly without holding an FAA medical certificate, as long as they meet certain requirements.

Until now, the FAA has required private, recreational, and student pilots, as well as flight instructors, to meet the requirements of and hold a third class medical certificate. They are required to complete an online application and undergo a physical examination with an FAA-designated Aviation Medical Examiner.

Starting May 1, pilots may take advantage of the regulatory relief in the BasicMed rule or opt to continue to use their FAA medical certificate. Under BasicMed, a pilot will be required to complete a medical education course, undergo a medical examination every four years, and comply with aircraft and operating restrictions. For example, pilots using BasicMed cannot operate an aircraft with more than six people onboard, and the aircraft must not weigh more than 6,000 pounds. See the FAA’s BasicMed web page and AC 68-1 for more information.

How to Get Your ADS-B Rebate

Aircraft owners – Are you interested in the FAA’s ADS-B rebate? If your aircraft is eligible (U.S. registered, fixed-wing, single-engine piston aircraft), you must then complete the following steps:

  • Decide: Purchase TSO-certified avionics and schedule the installation on your eligible aircraft.
  • Reserve: Before installation, use the FAA’s ADS-B Rebate website to submit a rebate reservation for your eligible aircraft. You will receive a Rebate Reservation Code.
  • Install: TSO-certified ADS-B avionics are installed on your eligible aircraft (step 2 must have been completed).
  • Fly & Validate: You must fly your aircraft in “rule airspace” (e.g., Class B or C, Class E above 10,000 feet) as defined in 14 CFR 91.225 for a minimum of 30 minutes, with at least 10 aggregate minutes of maneuvering, within 60 days of the installation date in Step 3. One hour or more after your flight, you must validate the performance of your eligible aircraft’s ADS-B installation by requesting a Public Performance Report, available on the FAA’s ADS-B Rebate website. After a successful validation, you will receive an Incentive Code.
  • Claim: Visit the ADS-B Rebate website and submit your Rebate Reservation Code from Step 2, and your Incentive Code from Step 4, within 60 days of the scheduled installation date to claim your rebate.

August newsletter items

The newsletter is being re-formatted a bit, and the August issue is coming this week. Scott has added a “wants and disposal” section so if any chapter members are looking for something or want to get rid of something and want it posted in the newsletter, please pass along a brief description of the item. Include your name and phone/email information and it will be posted. It needs to be sent by tonight to be included this month.

If anyone has any short updates or news items that they might think interesting to pass along, mail Scott.