IMC Club SQL

Topic: Join the local San Carlos IMC Club to keep your IFR skills sharp.
On Monday, January 11, 2021 at 19:00 Pacific Standard Time (20:00 MST, 21:00 CST, 22:00 EST, 17:00 HST, 18:00 AKST, 20:00 Arizona, 03:00 GMT)

Select Number:
WP15103185

Description:
IMC Club is a national organization meets monthly in the form of local chapters with the objective to promote instrument flying, proficiency, and safety. Pilots of all experience levels join to review actual IFR flying scenarios, review knowledge, and foster general discussion.

To view further details and registration information for this webinar, click here.

The Chemistry of Combustion A Molecular Look into Aviation Fuel

Topic: Do you know the chemistry of aviation fuel? Join us to find out more about the fuel that feeds your engine.
On Saturday, January 9, 2021 at 12:00 Pacific Standard Time (13:00 MST, 14:00 CST, 15:00 EST, 10:00 HST, 11:00 AKST, 13:00 Arizona, 20:00 GMT)

Select Number:
WP15103178

Description:
One of the first tasks a student pilot learns is to make sure during the preflight check that the proper fuel is loaded into the airplane. This is a critical step since having the wrong fuel onboard leads to engine malfunction and failure. Sadly, misfueling accidents continue to occur on a regular basis. But what is it that differentiates aviation fuels and why is it critical to have the proper fuel for the airplane?

In this seminar, join us as San Carlos Flight Center invites AGI Michel Vidal-Naquet as he gives a high level overview of the different fuels used in aviation: how fuel is produced from crude oil, what are the chemical differences between the grades of Avgas and Jet-fuel, and what is the chemistry of combustion and its relation to aircraft engine design. We will also address other issues such as the use of lead and discuss some misfueling accidents.

The seminar will lead to a deeper understanding of aviation fuel characteristics, and raise awareness about the critical importance of the fuel pre-flight check.

Michel Vidal-Naquet is an advanced and instrument ground instructor, and an instrument rated, commercial pilot with over 700 flight hours. He started flying in 2013 after settling in the Bay area to work as a computer scientist and engineer. His passion for aviation began during his early childhood when his family first took him on international flights. He brings a scientific point of view to his flying, and is always learning.

To view further details and registration information for this webinar, click here.

Tips for Using ForeFlight for a VFR Pilot Beginning Instrument Training

Topic: ForeFlight is a great resource for many pilots, especially while flying IFR. Join us to figure out how.
On Wednesday, January 6, 2021 at 19:00 Pacific Standard Time (20:00 MST, 21:00 CST, 22:00 EST, 17:00 HST, 18:00 AKST, 20:00 Arizona, 03:00 GMT)

Select Number:
WP15103127

Description:
ForeFlight, the iPad based electronic flight tools app, provides a lot of information for pilots to use both on the ground and in-flight. For VFR pilots that have mastered the functionality of ForeFlight relevant to VFR operations, is a different approach required?

If you are a Private Pilot beginning instrument training, you may be feeling a little lost in the fog of how to effectively use ForeFlight for your instrument training. What taps bring up the instrument approach chart? How can you use ForeFlight to plan and file an instrument flight plan? In this seminar, SCFC Chief Pilot Herb Patten will provide guidance for VFR pilots wanting to get the most out of ForeFlight, as they begin their instrument training. Tune in with your iPad at the ready so you can follow along.

Although we have many seminars devoted to ForeFlight use, this should be an interesting and new approach specifically for instrument students. Find out how to use ForeFlight to become cleared to depart and not have to go missed in your training.

Herb Patten is the Chief Pilot at the San Carlos Flight Center, a CFI and an FAA certificated advanced and instrument ground instructor who teaches private pilot ground school at San Carlos Flight Center. He is a commercial pilot with an instrument rating, has flown over 1,500 hours into at least 120 different California airports. He is the current chairman of the Upwind Foundation, famous for its Upwind Summer Scholarship Program. In 2015, Herb was named a Master Instructor by the National Association of Flight Instructors.

To view further details and registration information for this webinar, click here.

IMC Club Meeting ( ONLINE ONLY ) Lincoln EAA 1541

Topic: IMC Topics Are Taken From Real Life Events and Discussed to Aid the Decision Making Process for Pilots.
On Wednesday, January 6, 2021 at 19:00 Pacific Standard Time

Location:
online

Select Number:
WP25103108

Description:
This is an audience participation event. After a brief Audio/Video presentation we ask “What Would You Do”? Everyone is encouraged to join in the discussion. Videos depicting actual flights that encountered challenges are chosen from a library provided by EAA . Pilots of all skill levels are encouraged to attend. Click the link below for more information and to register TODAY.

To view further details and registration information for this seminar, click here.

Chapter 1541 Ray Scholars just keep on achieving!

Amy Whelan, chapter 1541’s first Ray Scholar, just passed her IFR checkride and is now Instrument Rated! Amy is shown here with her Embry Riddle University IFR achievement pin, standing in front of the “Pathways to the Sky” statue at ERU (known to the students as the Eagle Statue). Her Designated Pilot Examiner was a retired Air Force Pilot who flew out of both McClellan and Mather.

Amy says she is really enjoying college, but is looking forward to coming home for Christmas. She had the highest score in her class on the written test and finished her first semester on the Dean’s List, which caused proud Papa Scott to note “Pretty smart kid – must be from her Mom. She comes home tomorrow and is home for 3 weeks. When she returns to Embry-Riddle she will start her commercial rating.”

Congratulations, Amy!

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12/23 Comment on Proposed Removal of Stovepipe Wells Airport

Dear Members and Friends of CalPilots

We recently received notice from the Recreational Aviation Foundation (RAF) that the National Park Service (NPS) is considering closing the Stovepipe Wells airport in the Death Valley National Park.

According to the RAF, if the Park Service does not receive at least 400 comments from the pilot community regarding Stovepipe Wells, they will ignore the pilot’s input. WE NEED YOU TO COMMENT BEFORE DECEMBER 23.

I strongly encourage anyone who would like to help preserve our access to this airport to fill out this form:

Comment on proposed closure of Stovepipe Wells airport

It doesn’t take long, maybe ten minutes. This short amount of time could help preserve a valuable national resource. The complete message from the RAF is below. It contains some information that my be useful as you complete the comment form.

Sincerely,

Carol Ford, President

Managers of Death Valley National Park in California are seeking public input regarding future use of the park’s Stovepipe Wells Village. One of the park’s proposals is to change the Stovepipe Wells airstrip into a dedicated night sky viewing area due to the prohibitive maintenance expense of repaving the runway. This is due to the park’s perceived lack of visitation to the strip, combined with a growing interest in attendees in night-sky astronomy. With this change, the airstrip is in danger of closing entirely to light aircraft visitation.

The Recreational Aviation Foundation (RAF) believes that pilot activity and stargazing can successfully co-exist with minor changes to existing infrastructure, and we are urging members to submit comments to the park in support of both pastimes.

Death Valley National Park is more specifically proposing the following change (the following text was captured from the park’s official Facebook page):

• Night Sky Viewing to Replace Airstrip: night sky viewing events in the park regularly attract over 250 people, and very few people use the airstrip at Stovepipe Wells. The park proposes changing the airstrip into a place where astronomical societies can set up and camp with their large telescopes, while providing an opportunity to experience the park’s spectacular dark skies. The Furnace Creek Airport, 18 miles away, would still be available for small planes.

If the Park Service does not receive at least 400 comments from the pilot community regarding Stovepipe Wells, they will ignore the pilot’s input. WE NEED YOU TO COMMENT BEFORE DECEMBER 23.

Additional details and comment submission form can be found at the following link:

https://parkplanning.nps.gov/document.cfm?parkID=297&projectID=72747&documentID=107887

The RAF suggests the following talking points for members who wish to comment:

· Pilots support stargazing. This is a very successful combination of compatible pastimes. This has been proven at Havana, Illinois, where fly-in stargazing events draw many campers both by air and car. The Blue Canyon airport at Nyack, in Tahoe National Forest is another perfect example.

* Current facilities at Stovepipe Wells are at about 1/2 mile hike away. The airstrip will see a significant increase in visitation should facilities such as a dedicated camping area, as well as toilets be provided to visitors to the airport.

· At 3,260 x 65 ft and a significant existing visitors area, there is ample room for both activities at Stovepipe.

· Providing for under-wing camping at the airstrip helps disperse usage, and puts no additional strain on the NPS campground.

· Its daylight use by small planes minimizes impact to campers and star gazers.

· This airport has historical value, having been established in 1948.

· Stovepipe Airstrip provides another feasible way to access this special land. For many, driving to Stovepipe Wells represents a huge investment of time, and access by small plane opens up that opportunity.

Thank you in advance for your support of this RAF Call to Action! The RAF will be following up with final comments on our website in the near future.

Questions may be directed to CA State Liaisons Rick Lach: rlach@theraf.org and/or Katerina Barilov: kbarilov@theraf.org

December chapter meeting this coming Wed 12/16 at 19:00

Our monthly online chapter meeting will begin at 19:00 on Wednesday, December 16th.

Our program will be given by chapter member Mark Siemens on “My COVID Project: The Making of Scarlett”. Mark will detail the saga of transforming his recently acquired Cessna 182 into a 21st century dream plane, and lessons learned doing it.

Here is the info to join the party:

Time: Dec 16, 2020 19:00 Pacific Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting

Meeting ID: 810 7732 2252
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+16699009128,,81077322252# US (San Jose)

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Meeting ID: 810 7732 2252
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Airport Signs and Markings

Topic: Do you know all your airport signs and markings, and how they affect your movement of you and your aircraft around the airport?
On Saturday, December 19, 2020 at 12:00 Pacific Standard Time (13:00 MST, 14:00 CST, 15:00 EST, 10:00 HST, 11:00 AKST, 13:00 Arizona, 20:00 GMT)

Select Number:
WP15102902

Description:
Pop quiz: What is the new ICAO standard marking for a taxiway approaching a runway? What is the difference between a relocated threshold and a displaced threshold and what does that indicate to pilots?What is a runway approach holding sign and what are pilots expected to do?

Most pilots have an operational knowledge of the most common runway signs and markings, but if you travel to a larger airport, are you knowledgeable about some of the less common signs and markings? If it has been awhile since you sat through ground school, you may want to join us for a refresher on airport signs and markings. In this safety seminar, we will review the common markings and signs as well as delve into other less common but still important signs and markings.

This safety seminar is open to current and aspiring Private Pilots, and will be of particular interest to student pilots and those who are preparing for a flight review.

Kyle Smathers started flying in 2011 and is passionate about aviation. Kyle graduated from SJSU with an Aerospace Engineering degree, and now works as a CFI at San Carlos Flight Center. He is a Commercial: ASEL, Instrument Airplane Pilot. He offers training in Private Pilot, Commercial Pilot, High performance transition, Complex transition and Flight review.

To view further details and registration information for this webinar, click here.

Operating at Airports with Unimproved Surfaces

Topic: For most pilots, we are used to operating at paved, asphalt runways. But what happens if we land somewhere without one?
On Wednesday, December 16, 2020 at 19:00 Pacific Standard Time (20:00 MST, 21:00 CST, 22:00 EST, 17:00 HST, 18:00 AKST, 20:00 Arizona, 03:00 GMT)

Select Number:
WP15102993

Description:
There was a time when all airports didn’t have asphalt, pavement, or concrete. Nowadays it’s hard to think about operating at an airport without paved ramps, taxiways, and runways. But if you come across one, will you know how to operate safely?.

San Carlos Flight Center invites Chief Pilot Herb Patten to discuss operations at unpaved airports. Sure you were taught soft field takeoff and landing during your private pilot training, but how does that compare to operating on a real soft field like a grass runway. Learn effective techniques for approaching an unpaved runway including what to expect on landing, rollout and taxing along with what hazards exist on unpaved runways. We will also discuss the details of airports with unpaved runways that are in close proximity to San Carlos.

If you are ever interested in what it takes to safely operate at unpaved airports, join us for this seminar.

Herb Patten is the Chief Pilot at the San Carlos Flight Center, a CFI and an FAA certificated advanced and instrument ground instructor who teaches private pilot ground school at San Carlos Flight Center. He is a commercial pilot with an instrument rating, has flown over 2,000 hours into at least 130 different California airports. He is the current Executive Director of the Upwind Foundation, famous for its Upwind Summer Scholarship Program. In 2015, Herb was named a Master Instructor by the National Association of Flight Instructors.

To view further details and registration information for this webinar, click here.